Posts

Filter by Creator:

ALL BIANCHINI LOVE BIANCHINI-LOVE

Bianchini-Love

Sand Cast Engagement Rings

Updated: Feb 03, 2019

This is a special project that we are excited to present. During our last semester as undergraduates at MIT, we set out to create our own engagement rings. While the final rings are made of platinum, a pair of bronze and stainless steel rings were also made as part of the experimental process. In addition to the rings, we also created a wooden box to protect and house the rings when not on a finger. Built in the Course 3 foundry at MIT, the final product is a unique set of rings that have a special meaning to both of us.

Bianchini-Love

Aluminum Rubik's Cube

Updated: Feb 03, 2019

This is a long term project primarily for learning purposes and a novel product. I admire design and art, so this build can be considered an art project depending on the way you look at it. I'm working on this project with Elizabeth Bianchini as my machining skills can easily use the help of an actual mechanical engineer. The goal is to create an Rubik's cubed machined out of aluminum that is the size of a standard Rubik's cube with 0.75" sub-cubes. Some adjustments are being made as the build progresses, so stay tuned for updates!

Love

Website

Updated: Feb 03, 2019

This page documents the build process I've put into this website. I've always felt a need to document my work as I build projects, so I decided to make this site. It's been quite a learning process and has been an off-and-on side project of mine, mostly something I chip away at while not in school.

Love

554 Watt Spark Gap Tesla Coil

Updated: Feb 03, 2019

This is a project I completed in high school with Julian Thomassie - a close friend, and was our introduction to the world of high voltage. The purpose of this project was to learn the theory behind the operation of a resonant transformer and to successfully build a medium sized Tesla coil. A Tesla coil is a special type of transformer that generates large plasma arcs by increasing the voltage of the input current in two steps. The first step is the neon sign transformer which increases the standard 120V of a household wall outlet to 9 kV (in our case). Voltage is then stepped up again, but this time using two inductor-capacitor (LC) circuits tuned to the same resonant frequency. Matching the resonant frequencies of the two circuits allows for much larger voltage outputs than a conventional, non-resonant transformer. All of the safety features that seemed necessary in the circuit were included to ensure safe operation.

Love

96.9MHz Dipole Harvester

Updated: Sep 29, 2019

This energy harvester was created with a team of 4 other members as part of the MIT class 6.013: Electromagnetics and Applications. This project was very open ended, and had to incorporate a topic covered in the class at some point in the semester. This project focuses on dipole antenna design and includes some basic circuit design. As one of the tallest in Boston, the Prudential center is optimal for transmitting radio stations from its antenna/mast at the top of the building. This 96.6MHz dipole harvester harvests energy transmitted by the Prudential building and uses the harvested energy to flash an LED.

Bianchini

Pentris Python Computer Game

Updated: Feb 03, 2019

I made this advanced version of Tetris as a project for 15.112 Fundamentals of Programming as a part of Carnegie Mellon University's precollege program. Using Python 2 and TkInter to produce the simple GUI, I made Pentris like Tetris, but where all pieces have 5 blocks in them instead of 4. Additional features include mirroring pieces, piece previews, hard drops, and high score tables.

Bianchini-Love

Simple Clock

Updated: Sep 27, 2019

Simple clock is a just as the name implies: a minimalistic clock that has one button and one potentiometer and no extraneous features. The button is used to set the time; pressing and holding the button speeds up the seconds by a factor of 250 and a prolonged press of the button (after pressing the button for roughly 6 seconds real time) puts the clock into super fast mode, with one hour ticking by approximately every second. The potentiometer controls the brightness of the entire display, including the colons. This project uses the display and part of the code from Henry's final project from 6.115 - Microcomputer Project Laboratory. After re-discovering the breadboarded 7-segments displays, the project was resurrected and behold SIMPLE CLOCK!!!!

Bianchini

Baseball Music Box

Updated: Apr 13, 2019

I wanted to build a unique engineering-focused display for a baseball in a way that would make people laugh. I used this idea for my project in Stanford's class ME203 Design and Manufacturing. My inspiration came from my desire to make a gift for a family friend whose was a Major League baseball player when he was younger, then became an engineer for the rest of his career. Thus, a baseball display with exposed engineering elements would be the perfect way for my friend to display a piece of his young and later life in her apartment.

Bianchini-Love

Wakeboard for Bianchinis

Updated: Apr 20, 2019

If you know the Bianchinis, you know that they love water sports. After spending time with the Bianchinis during the summer of 2017, Henry wanted to create a gift for them. Henry's Crocs are a point of contention between him and Mrs. Bianchini, so (mostly) as a joke, he decided to create a wakeboard with boots as Crocs. Please note that this wakeboard is not intended to be used as a real wakeboard; it's intended to be a wall piece, or a funny item. As one of the smallest people you'll ever meet, the boots and wakeboard are sized to fit Mrs. Bianchini's (with maybe a bit of exaggeration...) since Henry noticed all but she had a wakeboard to use.

Love

Wall Light

Updated: Apr 20, 2019

When I was walking back to my dorm after class, I found a beautiful piece of wood outside the MIT 2.008 machine shop being thrown away with a bunch of other things. It was once a block of wood for holding endmills/bits with a natural patina from years of machine oil and grease. The wood block had some small aluminum chips embedded in it, however, I didn’t try to get those out, because they tell its story as a block of wood from an MIT machine shop. This was too good to pass up, so I grabbed it. After some thinking, I decided to make a wall lamp out of the piece of wood and made it a (late… oops…) gift for Bibit’s 23rd birthday.

Bianchini-Love

Lock Picking Set

Updated: Feb 03, 2019

This project spun out of the idea to do a project in one day (this ended up taking 2 days, with a few days in between). Henry and Bibit decided to make a lock picking set because a friend had recently gotten one, which we had grown fond of. Over the course of the project, we used a water jet, a laser cutter, a Prototrak Mill, a lathe, and an Othermill, using materials including steel, aluminum, and two types of wood.

Bianchini

Industrial Design of a Home Solar Energy System

Updated: Feb 03, 2019

The MIT Development Lab (D-Lab) connects student teams with international community partners who work on projects to better developing communities. Through a D-Lab class, I partnered with Voya Sol, a company that develops home solar energy systems for rural Zimbabweans to build their own micro grids. I and my team focused on the industrial design of the appliance, including the user interface and features that would define how the appliance lives in the home.

Bianchini

Herreshoff Steam Engine

Updated: Aug 06, 2020

For my undergraduate thesis, I documented my process in manufacturing sand cast parts for a 1897 Herreshoff steam engine. The project got started through the Pappalardo Apprenticeship program I had joined the previous year. The final functional steam engine is part of a demonstration at an MIT Museum exhibit on Nathanael Greene Herreshoff that opened in fall 2018. I manufactured four of the engine components: the iron column, two iron gibs, and the bronze bearing crosshead.

Bianchini

Lamp

Updated: Feb 03, 2019

As a result of my learning how to weld and use new pieces of machinery, I built a steel, wall-mounted, cantilevered lamp that would fit the constraints of my bedroom. It functions as a simple lamp with a dimmer switch, but the unique design incorporates a slender, wall-mounted body that fits within the three-inch piece of wall between my bed's headboard and a stair railing. The 3-foot blackened steel arm is supported by a thin bicycle cable and can swing in a 180-degree arc from over the middle of my bed to over the stairwell in my room. The head of the lamp rotates to direct light.

Bianchini-Love

Simple Clock PCBs

Updated: Sep 01, 2020

After completing our Simple Clock project, which housed four breadboards full of clock components, we decided to make a PCB version. This version has all of the same components and capabilities of Simple Clock, all in a much smaller form factor that we designed to comfortably sit on a surface.

Love

Dynamic Bash Command Prompt Highlighting

Updated: Feb 03, 2019

In this project, I created dynamic coloring for my bash command prompt. There are a variety of shells for the command line, however the code presented below is designed for bash Unix shell, the default login shell used for Apple's macOS. While there are many third party resources that make it easy to change the color of your command prompt, the majority of them do not support dynamic prompt coloring - that is, coloring that changes to facilitate the reading of your working directory. This post goes over how to add dynamic command prompt coloring to your bash shell and discusses a few ways to customize your prompt appearance!

Bianchini-Love

Peg Chair

Updated: Feb 03, 2019

Inspired by a chair found in an MIT machine shop, we built a peg chair, designed as a way to temporarily "sit" and take > 50% of the weight off your feet. The height is adjustable, and the seat is easily replaceable with any standard-mount bicycle seat. It's a quirky way to pseudo-sit-stand or an efficient way to produce another seat for more guests.

Bianchini

Struct Surprise Toy Blocks

Updated: Feb 03, 2019

I built Struct with a team of 4 other members as part of the MIT class 2.00B. One of MIT's most popular classes, 2.00B Toy Product Design taught by Professor David Wallace and Dr. Maria Yang gives students an overview of design for entertainment purposes. Throughout the process, students develop ideas for new toys that serve clients in the community, and work in teams with local sponsors and experienced mentors on a themed toy design project. The spring 2015 theme was "Surprise"! We made a set of identical (looking) blocks that each behaved differently and surprisingly when interacting with it in a hands-on way.

Bianchini

Mass-Manufactured Nautical Yo-Yos

Updated: Feb 03, 2019

My team of 5 people designed a nautical-themed yo-yo, which we designed for mass manufacturing and of which we fabricated 50. We learned how to design for manufacture, to use injection molding and thermoforming machines, and to use MasterCAM to program CNC mills and lathes. I specifically did the design, tooling manufacturing, and production run of the ship steering wheel featured on both sides of the yo-yo.

Bianchini

Go-Karts

Updated: Feb 03, 2019

My dad and I originally got the idea of building go-karts when I was 4 years old. After two wooden boards with wheels sat for years in our playroom, we decided we wanted to finish the project when I was 9. The humble vision of a push-powered soapbox derby transformed into three customized, eye-catching electric go-karts with forward and reverse drive, horn, headlights, and personalized paint jobs for my and my sisters' unique personalities.

Love

Sea Glass Necklace

Updated: Apr 20, 2019

After going to Revere beach with some friends and finding a lot of sea glass, I decided to do something with some of the glass I found and make a necklace for Bibit. Sea glass is glass that is naturally weathered by the ocean waves and sand, leading to a frosted, smooth surface on glass that has been in the sea for years. According to Wikipedia, sea glass can take 20 - 40 years, sometimes up to 100 years to achieve its rounded and frosted appearance. This makes it a "cool" artifact to use to make jewelry. In addition, it's cheap (free if found on the beach), and no two pieces are exactly alike. On this trip, I found approximately 30 pieces of glass and settled on two to use in this necklace. With some experimentation and trial and error, this necklace was produced!

Love

FPGA Beethoven

Updated: Feb 03, 2019

I worked on this project with Mark Yang as our final project for 6.111 - Introductory Digital Systems Laboratory. Let's jump right in! Being able to hear what is on sheet music is very helpful to musicians beginning to learn a piece of music. Having auditory input can help people learn notes and rhythm more quickly and correct current mistakes. To make the transfer of sheet music to sound, we propose a digital music reading machine. This project will process a digital image of a score, and play the notes back to the user. There are two main parts to this project; note recognition (pitch and rhythm) and audio playback. This project starts with the reading of simple notes, rhythms and key signatures. If time permits, this project will evolve to read a score, notes that do not lie on the ledger lines, and music with accidentals. A user interface will allow the user to input the tempo and key signature of the piece before sight reading occurs.

Love

Analog Drawing Board

Updated: Feb 03, 2019

This was a team project I worked on with Nicholas Klugman as our final project for 6.101 - Analog Electronics Lab. Most technology created today is created with the intent of being used by an individual. The way humans interact with technology is highly important and can determine whether or not a product is successful. Because of this, the way in which people interact with technology cannot be overlooked. This project focuses on bridging the gap between technology and a user; providing an easy and familiar way for humans to interact with a product. In this project, a wireless drawing board was created, where a user can draw on a piece of resistive paper and have it displayed on a screen of an oscilloscope. The user interface developed in this project was inspired by a touchpad/drawing board where the user holds a stylus that controls the location of a cursor on a screen. While the goal of interfacing to a real computer was not demonstrated, proof of concept has shown that one can wireless transmit cursor location to a receiver that can decode and make use of the data. The connection between the board and the computer is wireless, using a hybrid of frequency and amplitude modulation. This project has three main elements: the drawing board and the circuitry that drives it (“Drawing Board” and “Drawing Board Driver”), encoding and sending this data wirelessly to a receiver (“Voltage Scaler”, “VCO”, and “Transmitter”), and decoding this information so it can displayed on a screen (“Receiver”, “Frequency to Voltage”, and “Display”)